Julia Ward Howe


On January 28, 1908, author and activist Julia Ward Howe, famous for her composition, "The Battle Hymn of the Republic," became the first woman elected to the American Academy of Arts and Letters.

Born in New York City in 1819, Howe expressed her ambition to become a writer early on. She married social activist and reformer Samuel Gridley Howe in 1843. By theJulia Ward Howe mid-1850s Julia strongly supported her husband's embrace of the abolitionist movement and and they soon saw the inevitability of war. In late 1861, the couple was among a group visiting Washington, D.C., to appraise the status of Union troop morale after the First Battle of Bull Run.

On November 18, 1861, Howe's party was invited to review the Union troops outside of Washington.  A sudden Confederate attack disrupted the proceedings.  During the return trip to Washington, the Howes' carriage was surrounded by Union troops who joined them in singing popular Army songs of the time.  These events became the inspiration for Howe's "The Battle Hymn of the Republic." She wrote the poem to the tune of "John Brown's Body," a marching song popular among Union soldiers. Published in the Atlantic Monthly in February 1862, the author received just a few dollars for the piece. Although soldiers were reluctant to abandon their improvised verse to the popular folk song, the poem proved popular among civilians in the North. Soon "The Battle Hymn of the Republic" rang out at public gatherings above the Mason-Dixon line.





Century of Struggle
Century of Struggle
The Womans Rights Movement

Young suffragists who helped forge the last links in that chain were not born when it began. Old suffragists who forged the first links were dead when it ended. It is doubtful if any man, even among suffrage men, ever realized what the suffrage struggle came to mean to women
 

 

Alice Paul, 1915

Alice Paul, 1915
9 in. x 12 in.
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Framed   Mounted
The Head of the Women's Suffrage Parade Photograph - Washington, DC
The Head of the Women's Suffrage Parade
Photograph - Washington, DC Giclee Print

24 in. x 18 in.
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Framed   Mounted

Women of the American Suffrage Movement
Womens Suffrage Timeline
American Civil War Women
Womens Civil War Reading Titles
American Civil War Recipes
Civil War Exhibits


Dora Lewis (center) of Philadelphia [with Clara Louise Rowe (left) and Abby Scott Baker (right)] on release from jail after days of hunger strike. August 1918.

The day after the police announce that future pickets would be given limit of 6 mos. in prison,
Alice Paul led picket line with banner reading "The time has come to conquer or submit for there is but one choice - we have made it."
She is followed by Mrs. Lawrence Lewis [Dora Lewis]. This group received 6 mos. in prison.
click to enlarge photo

Left to right: Adelaide Johnston, sculptor, Mrs. Lawrence [Dora] Lewis, Phila., Jane Addams. At time statue was placed in capitol.

Women
Feminism and Suffrage: The Emergence of an Independent Women's Movement in America, 1848-1869
In the two decades since Feminism and Suffrage was first published, the increased presence of women in politics and the gender gap in voting patterns have focused renewed attention on an issue generally perceived as nineteenth-century
Kate Stone
Brokenburn: The Journal of Kate Stone, 1861-1868 (Library of Southern Civilization)
At the start of the war Kate was surrounded by servants who met her every need. But twenty year old Kate Stone's life would be more directly affected by the war. Kate Stone's Louisiana home was occupied by the Yankees forcing the family to flee to Texas. Describes the deprivations of the war years, lack of shoe leather, lack of cloth and the unavailability of new books, and at times cheered by false reports of great southern victories
Cruel War
When Will This Cruel War Be Over?
A Confederate girl in Virginia, in 1864, Emma Simpson writes about the hardships of growing up during a turbulent time
Kindle Available
Dear America
Dear America: When Will This Cruel War Be Over?

The peaceful, traditional Southern life that Emma Simpson and her family know is shattered when the Civil War reaches their soil. Soon, Emma's father and brother are called to battle, but her family is confident the South will quickly win the War between the States.

One Woman One Vote
One Woman One Vote
This program documents the struggle which culminated in the passing of the 19th Amendment in the U.S. Senate by one vote. Witness the 70-year struggle for women's suffrage. Discover why the crusaders faced entrenched opposition from men and women who feared the women's vote would ignite a social revolution. DVD
Stanton and Anthony
Not for Ourselves Alone: The Story of Elizabeth Cady Stanton & Susan B. Anthony
Together they fought for women everywhere, and their strong willpower and sheer determination still ripples through contemporary society. Here lies the story of two of our century's most celebrated pioneers Elizabeth Cady Stanton and Susan B. Anthony. DVD
Fathers House
Out of Our Fathers House
Broadway Theatre Archive

This play presents the true stories of women who sought independence at any cost. The compelling text is taken entirely from the diaries, journals and letters of the characters portrayed.

Sources:
U.S. Library of Congress



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