Kindle Available
Chicago Battery Boys

CHICAGO'S BATTERY BOYS
Organized in 1862 as part of John McClernand's 13th Corps, the battery participated in the arduous Vicksburg campaign. The artillerists performed well everywhere, Chickasaw Bluffs, Port Gibson, Champion Hill, Big Black River, and the siege of Vicksburg

Corydon Indiana


American Civil War
July 9, 1863

Kindle Available
John Hunt Morgan Raiders

John Hunt Morgan and His Raiders
The "Thunderbolt of the Confederacy" John Hunt Morgan from Tompkinsville, Kentucky to Greeneville, Tennessee.

On July 2, 1863, Brig. General John Morgan, with about 2,450 hand-picked cavalrymen, rode into Kentucky to disrupt the communications of the Union Army of the Cumberland, which began its operations against Bragg's Army of Tennessee (Tullahoma Campaign) on June 23.

Crossing the Cumberland River at Burkesville, Morgan's column advanced to the Green River where it was deflected by a Union regiment at Tebb's Bend on July 4. Morgan surprised and captured the garrison at Lebanon, Kentucky, then rode via Springfield, Bardstown, and Garnettsville.

On July 8, Morgan crossed the Ohio River at Mauckport, Indiana, despite orders to remain south of the river in Kentucky. Union military officials called out the militia in Indiana and Ohio and worked feverishly to organize a defense.

On July 9, near Corydon, Indiana, elements of Morgan's force encountered about 400 Home Guards and captured most of them. As Morgan continued eastward to Ohio, destroying bridges, railroads, and government stores, Federal columns converged to prevent Morgan from recrossing into Kentucky.

Result(s): Confederate victory

Location: Harrison

Campaign: Morgan's Raid in Kentucky, Indiana, Ohio (July 1863)

Date(s): July 9, 1863

Principal Commanders: Col. Lewis Jordan [US]; Brig. General John Hunt Morgan [CS]

Forces Engaged: 2,200 total (US 400; CS 1,800)

Estimated Casualties: 401 total (US 360; CS 41)


The Partisan Rangers of the Confederate States Army: Memoirs of General Adam R. Johnson
The capture of Newburg, Indiana, with only twelve men and two joints of stovepipe mounted on the running gear of a wagon. This episode won him a nickname of "Stovepipe." He was promoted to Brigadier General in June 1864


NYV Draft Riots
The New York City Draft Riots: Their Significance for American Society and Politics in the Age of the Civil War

For five days in July 1863, at the height of the Civil War, New York City was under siege. Angry rioters burned draft offices, closed factories, destroyed railroad tracks and telegraph lines, and hunted policemen and soldiers. Before long, the rioters also turned their murderous wrath against the black community
Battlefield Atlas
A Battlefield Atlas of the Civil War
Informative text enhanced 24 three-color maps and 30 black/white historical photographs.

The Official Virginia
Civil War Battlefield Guide

Virginia was host to nearly 1/3rd of all Civil War engagements. This guide covers them all like a mini-history of the war. This guide organizes battles chronologically. Each campaign has a detailed overview, followed by concise descriptions of the individual engagements
Kindle Available
Maps of Bull Run
The Maps of First Bull Run: An Atlas of the First Bull Run (Manassas) Campaign, including the Battle of Ball's Bluff, June-October 1861
Kindle Available
Indian Territory

Civil War in the Indian Territory
When the war broke out, both sides wanted the Five Civilized Tribes, led by the Cherokees, and each got around half. The Confederacy sent Brigadier General Albert Pike to recruit them, and he did a pretty good job. A strange, brilliant, man, Pike's career as a General is a minor footnote in his long life

Shiloh and Corinth: Sentinels of Stone

The brave deeds performed by soldiers of the North and South. Approximately 93 striking photographs and accompanying histories bring the battlefields to life, from Shiloh and Savannah, Tennessee, to Iuka and Corinth, Mississippi
Kindle Available

One Continuous Fight: The Retreat from Gettysburg and the Pursuit of Lee's Army of Northern Virginia
The first detailed military history of Lee's retreat and the Union effort to catch and destroy the wounded Army of Northern Virginia Complimented with 18 original maps, dozens of photos, and a complete driving tour with GPS coordinates of the entire retreat

Bloody Roads South: The Wilderness to Cold Harbor, May-June 1864
This chronicles the great 1864 Overland Campaign, forty days that marked the end of the Civil War. In detail the battles in Virginia's Wilderness to the combat at Spotsylvania the trap laid by Lee at the North Anna River, to the killing ground of Cold Harbor

Sources:
U.S. National Park Service
U.S. Library of Congress.