Columbia Tennessee


American Civil War
November 24-29, 1864

Conflict near Columbia, during CSA General Hood's 1864 Tennessee invasion, constituted a Confederate diversion as part of a maneuver designed to cross the Duck River upstream and interdict the Union army's line of communications with Nashville. As General John Bell Hood's army advanced northeastward from Florence, Alabama, Major General John M. Schofield's force quickly withdrew from Pulaski to Columbia, arriving on November 24, just ahead of Forrest's Rebel cavalry.

The Federals built two lines of earthworks south of the town while skirmishing with enemy cavalry on November 24 and 25. Hood advanced his infantry on the following day but did not assault. He made demonstrations along the front while marching two corps of his army to Davis Ford, some five miles eastward on the Duck River.

Schofield correctly interpreted Hood's moves, but foul weather prevented him from crossing to the north bank before November 28, leaving Columbia to the Confederates. The next day, both armies marched north for Spring Hill. Schofield had slowed Hood's movement but had not stopped him.

Result(s): Confederate victory

Location: Maury County

Campaign: Franklin-Nashville Campaign (1864)

Date(s): November 24-29, 1864

Principal Commanders: Major General John M. Schofield [US]; General John Bell Hood [CS]

Forces Engaged: XXIII Army Corps and elements of IV Army Corps [US]; Army of Tennessee [CS]

Estimated Casualties: Unknown

Confederates Last Hurrah
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Kindle Available
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Tennessee in the Civil War

Selected Contemporary Accounts of Military and Other Events, Month by Month
Battle at Pittsburg Landing Art Print
Pitssburg Landing Civil War Tennessee

Lodge Logic Camp Dutch Oven
Large 8 quart cast iron oven. The legs are for ease of use in campfires. Flanged lid to place coals on top of oven. Great for stews, chilli, roasts (wild game) and complete recipes for everything including old-fashioned bread. A must for reenactors villages.

Camping Supplies
Cast Iron Waffle Iron
12 Inch Pre Seasoned Cast Iron Skillet
Full size military Camp Cot
One and two man tents
Large size and multiple room tents
Hiking Boots
Jan Sport Back Packs
High Sierra Camp Equipment
Tennessee State Battle Map
State Battle Maps
American Civil War Exhibits
Campaigns of the War
Civil War Summary
Documents of the Civil War
Confederate Commanders
Union Generals
Civil War Timeline
Women Civil War Soldiers
Ships and Naval Battles
Confederate Supplies
Civil War Revolver Pistol
Civil War Model 1851 Naval Pistol
Engraved Silver Tone / Gold Tone Finish and Wooden Grips - Replica of Revolver Used by Both USA / Union and CSA / Confederate Forces

12 Inch Action Figures
Kindle Available
John Bell Hood

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John Bell Hood entered the Confederate Army at 29, loyal to Confederate Independence. He led his men into the battles of Second Manassas, Gaines's Mill, Sharpsburg, Fredericksburg, Gettysburg, and Chickamauga
Kindle Available
Tennessee in the Civil War
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Selected Contemporary Accounts of Military and Other Events, Month by Month
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The Last Confederate General: John C. Vaughn and His East Tennessee Cavalry
The first man to raise an infantry regiment in the state, and one of the very last Confederate generals to surrender.History has not been kind to Vaughn, who finally emerges from the shadows in this absorbing reassessment of his life and military career

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Guide to Civil War Nashville
The importance of Nashville during the Civil War, the campaigns that led up to and followed the battle, the actual Battle of Nashville, landmarks, tour guides, historic structures, markers, maps and GPS coordinates are given for many of the historic sites
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Southern Storm
Sherman's March to the Sea

The destruction spanned more than sixty miles in width and virtually cut the South in two, disabling the flow of supplies to the Confederate army. He led more than 60,000 Union troops to blaze a path from Atlanta to Savannah, ordering his men to burn crops, kill livestock, and decimate everything that fed the Rebel war machine

Women in the War
Civil War Cooking
Civil War Submarines
Kids Zone Causes of the War

 

Sources:
U.S. National Park Service
U.S. Library of Congress.


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